The Social and Behavior Change Communication (SBCC) Campaign on Demand Reduction of Luxury Wood Furniture was launched today via ZOOM and Facebook Live on the USAID Cambodia Green Future Activity.

The launch took place in the presence of Mr. Richard Chen, Director of Sustainable Economic Growth Office, USAID/Cambodia, and Mrs. Meas Chanthyda, Deputy Director General, General Directorate of Environmental Knowledge and Information, Ministry of Environment.

The campaign is one of three which will feature multimedia content through online platforms to support young people as “Green Champions” to model successful behaviours and practices around the protection of Cambodia’s natural resources.

“The demand for luxury timber has increased significantly in both local and international markets, which contributes to deforestation and loss of particular tree species such as the Burmese rosewood in Cambodia’s tropical forests,” noted Mr. Richard Chen. “We hope that this campaign will provide useful information and better options for Cambodian citizens, especially youth, to consider as they make choices that impact their environment. Taking the right actions today can lead to positive impacts in the future for Cambodia’s forests and wildlife. Keep the trees where they belong.”

“All Cambodians, young and old, have a common duty to conserve and protect our precious natural resources,” said Mrs. Meas Chanthyda. “The campaign’s objectives support the Royal Government of Cambodia’s National Environmental Strategy and Action Plan, which aim to strengthen the effectiveness of environmental protection, natural resource management, biodiversity conservation, and sustainable development.”

Today’s launch underscores the U.S. government’s commitment to promote environmental protection, sustainable use of natural resources, and positive actions from the public to conserve Cambodia’s rich natural heritage for the benefit of all citizens as well as future generations.

Source: Agency Kampuchea Press

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